Toba Khedoori

Memory’s Work: The Art of Toba Khedoori

The appeal of Toba Khedoori’s work lies, perhaps, in the enigmatic precision with which her images are made. It lends them the virtue of high-draughtsmanship. But it is…

george schrimpf

Why happiness can’t be strategised

One of the most profound books I read as a younger person was Albert Camus’s The Myth of Sisyphus. The essence of Camus’ argument is that human existence…

Ab ovo (1917), by Paul Klee

Turn 40 and don’t fade away

I’ve just turned 40 years old. It’s not an enormous number, not an elephantine age. But it’s a number that I can’t help take notice of. Perhaps I…

The Bureau of the Centre for the Study of Surrealism and its Legacy

Mark Dion at the Whitechapel Gallery, London

For our modern age – prone to jump to the defence of science, of data-driven evidence – there is something unusually wistful about the art of Mark Dion….

Kandinsky Jaune Rouge Bleu

Unreliable Trivia – The Value of the Mistaken Fact

It’s a bad habit, but when I’m in public I often listen in on other people’s conversations. Just recently I was sitting on a busy train when, straining…

Corner of the House (1922), Oil on canvas

David Milne at the Dulwich Picture Gallery

The Canadian artist David Milne was born in 1882. By all accounts he was a modest man with a leaning towards the austere. Raised in a log cabin…

Coventry railway station

Coventry Railway Station: A Murky Masterpiece

I’ve never been sure about Coventry railway station. Bold perpendicular lines of grey concrete, shifting mezzanine levels, fierce observance to geometric spatial qualities. I could always see it…

Andreas Gursy, Montparnasse

Andreas Gursky

Gursky likes to print his images on very large scale paper. Think Monet’s water lily series at the Orangerie, Paris. So as you approach a work it fills your horizontal field of vision. As well as enveloping you, the technique also has the effect of encouraging you to forget about edges of the picture, to disregard what lies beyond, and to overlook the very deliberate cropping that Gursky undertakes.

Digital muzak

Digital Muzak: How they sell us our iPhones

The life force of a digital device, a mobile phone or a handheld tablet, can give the impression of something magical. The glowing screen and pulsing ribbons of…

Life drawing model in reclined pose

Embarrassed yet? Some naked truths about life drawing classes

For the last six weeks I’ve been going to life drawing classes at a local college. Just as you see in films or on TV, the disrobed figure…

A Time of Gifts: Fermour and the memoir

As a form of literature, the memoir has often struck me as an odd. The author assembles a small museum of personal artifacts for the purpose of describing…

Review of “Degas to Picasso: Creating Modernism in France” at the Ashmolean

Modernism has a habit of returning, of seeming pertinent as a bearer of explanations, long after its paradigms have been eclipsed. Changes in artistic epoch are like the…

Leonard Cohen

Leonard Cohen Has Died

Leonard Cohen has died. I can think of no-one whose specific blend of personal traits has inspired me so strongly. He always bore an attitude that I have…

The Myth of Sisyphus

How to get lost (Or the difficulties of giving up a book)

There are two books that I am perpetually midway through, no matter how many times I pick them up. One is the diaries of Paul Klee and the…

The Human Document

Review of ‘The Human Document: The Photography of Persuasion from 1930s America to Present Day’ at Mead Gallery, Coventry

There are few social-documentary photographs more well known, nor more heavily plundered for significance, than those of rural America from the era of the Great Depression. Black-and-white shots…

A Weimar Woman: Lotte Laserstein

The recent acquisition of Lotte Laserstein’s Evening Over Potsdam (Abend über Potsdam, 1930) by the Berlin National Gallery offers the opportunity for the public to view a painting…

Remain or Leave?

The Brexit referendum is now decided, and the fall-out is now unfurling like a virtual-reality landscape. Nothing can be predicted; nothing is unexpected. It has not been an…

Review of Barbara Walker’s ‘Shock and Awe’ at mac Birmingham

In the victory parades in Paris that crowned the end of the Second World War, the Allied Nations agreed that Black soldiers – those mainly from the colonial…

Short story ‘Meteors’ to appear in Firewords Quarterly

I’m happy say I’m about to be published in the literary magazine Firewords Quarterly, whose latest issue, available from April 2016, has as its theme ‘secrets’. Firewords publishes…

Brexit: Passport Control Verses Freedom to Roam

I am yet to arrive at a clear idea of what a European Brexit (yet more portmanteaus!) would mean for the plight of old Blighty (or Plighty), yet…